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Macedonia Leaders Agree to Speed up Inquiry

June 8, 2013

The Prime Minister and the new opposition leader agreed to step up talks on forming an inquiry into last year’s events in parliament, which triggered a prolonged political crisis.

 
Sinisa Jakov Marusic, Balkan Insight, 07.06.2013

 

Nikola Gruevski [left] and Zoran Zaev [right] | Photo by: MIA

Prime Minister Nikola Gruevski and the head of the Social Democrats, Zoran Zaev, agreed on Thursday to finally form a commission of inquiry into the events of December 24, 2012.

“Interlocutors agreed to intensify the communication” on this issue, a press release from the government said, adding that “Both [leaders] showed their full commitment to the process”.

The meeting, which lasted an hour-and-a-half, was the first meeting between the two leaders since Zaev was elected last weekend as new head of the Social Democrats. The meeting came after Gruevski congratulated Zaev on his election by telephone.

Brussels has been urging the country’s leaders to set up the commission of inquiry, agreed as part of an EU-brokered deal struck on March 1 that ended a months-long political crisis.

The EU said it would show that Skopje means business when talking about its commitment to starting EU accession talks.

The commission was initially intended to be formed in March. But delays occurred when Gruevski’s VMRO DPMNE party and the opposition failed to agree on several issues, most importantly on the chair of the body.

The commission is to comprise political party representatives and experts working under the supervision of the European Union.

The EU-brokered deal of March 1 ended a long political crisis in the country, which began on December 24, 2012, when the government parties passed a budget for 2013 in only minutes, after opposition MPs and journalists were expelled from the chamber.

Weeks of street protests followed, along with a boycott of parliament and an opposition threat to boycott the recently finished local elections.

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From → FYROM, Politics

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